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National Geographic get it wrong - this baby will live forever

This month's cover edition of National Geographic shows a picture of a baby and the proclamation that this baby will live to 120. I believe they are way off the mark and that any baby being born today (in the developed world at least) has a fighting chance of living forever. I've been meaning to write a blog to crystallize my thoughts on the exponential growth in medical technology and the implications for human health, longevity and society. Heavily influenced by Ray Kurzweil's singularity prediction I see the early signs of embryonic technologies everywhere which combined will dramatically change the lives of everyone one of us.

national geographic this baby will live to be 120

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American monthly magazine covering geography, history, nature and science

Automation improves chances of human survival

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