Join the club for FREE to access the whole archive and other member benefits.

Don W. Cleveland

Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at University of California, San Diego

Cleveland is interested in the genes and proteins involved in mitotic spindle assembly and faithful chromosome segregation just prior to division. This process is particularly relevant to the development of cancer because it is thought that cancer cells mis-segregate chromosomes due to errors in mitosis resulting in aneuploidy. The major pathway guarding against whole chromosome mis-segregation is the mitotic checkpoint, a cell cycle control mechanism in which the centromeres of unattached chromosomes generate an inhibitor that blocks cyclin B degradation and advance across mitosis. The antitumor drug taxol is effective by chronically activating this checkpoint. In the past year, starting from all purified components Cleveland’s efforts have reconstructed mitotic checkpoint signaling in vitro. Additionally, abnormalities in number of microtubule organizing centers (centrosomes) can promote errors in spindle formation that lead to subsequent chromosome missegregation and extra centrosomes are associated with many cancers. Like DNA, centrosomes are duplicated only once each cell cycle. The duplication process is governed by polo-like kinase 4 (Plk4). Cleveland’s recent efforts identified how centrosome over-replication is blocked: kinase-mediated, autoregulated instability of Plk4 acts to self-limit Plk4 activity so as to prevent centrosome amplification.

 Login to view link, or join the club to get full access to all resources and other benefits.

See also: Academia University of California, San Diego (UCSD) - Public Research university.

Don W. Cleveland News

Scientists find a new and easy way of producing neurons

Science Daily - 25-Jun-2020

PTB is the ultimate switch that controls conversion of a cell into a neuron

Read more...